Our Lassa fever experiences – Survivors

Some Nigerians who contracted Lassa fever have shared their experiences on how they survived the disease. The survivors shared their experiences in a statement by the Médecins Sans Frontières, also known as Doctors Without Borders, on Wednesday.

Our Lassa fever experiences – Survivors
Some Nigerians who contracted Lassa fever have shared their experiences on how they survived the disease. The survivors shared their experiences in a statement by the Médecins Sans Frontières, also known as Doctors Without Borders, on Wednesday. The statement was titled, “Lassa fever: not only a neglected disease, but neglected patients too.” Fourteen-year-old Nneoma Okonogha, in the statement, said, “The experience was strange; I thought I was really in a nightmare.” Nneoma, along with her sister, Ukamaka and their mother, Priscilla, caught the viral haemorrhagic fever at the same time. The three of them were treated at the Alex Ekwueme University Teaching Hospital in Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. “It was so severe that when the children were shouting in pain, I couldn’t help them because I was also down with pain,” said Priscilla, who also works at the hospital as a civil servant. Another survivor, from Abakaliki, identified as Anastasia, in the statement, said she was able to access the anti-viral treatment she needed to recover. “I contracted Lassa fever in February 2021. When I tested positive, I was shocked to the bone. It came like malaria, and I bought anti-malaria drugs from a pharmaceutical shop. When I took it for three days, I was still sick. In fact, my situation was worse,” she said. Lassa fever kills consultants, Nasarawa doctors ask for N100,000 hazard allowance Médecins Sans Frontières, in the statement, added that the goal of the organisation was to eradicate Lassa fever in Ebonyi State. It said, “Since the beginning of our operations on Lassa fever in partnership with the Ministry of Health in Ebonyi State, the goal has been to tackle the root causes of Lassa fever and its broad spread impact on infected individuals.” “A trial of rapid diagnostic testing for Lassa fever is currently at the core of research at the Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital Abakaliki. If an RDT proves effective, it could help drastically to reduce the waiting time for results from a laboratory test.” Also, a medical doctor with the organisation, Okereke Uche, said, “We want to see if the RDT could be a substitute in the management or diagnosis of Lassa fever. Timing is important; a patient moves from a mild condition to severe. And when it becomes severe, it is more difficult to manage.”